Tiger Woods Makes His Return to the PGA Tour -- Here's a Look Back at His Legendary and Iconic Career

Tiger Woods Makes His Return to the PGA Tour — Here’s a Look Back at His Legendary and Iconic Career

On February 16, Tiger Woods made his return to the PGA Tour at the 2023 Genesis Invitational – a PGA Tour event hosted by Woods and played at the Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles, CA. He finished the tourney tied for 45th place at -1 after shooting a 69, 74, 67, and 73. The winner was Jon Rahm at -17.

In 1992, Woods made his PGA Tour debut at 16 years old at this very same event. 31 years later, here he is. It was his first PGA Tour event since July 2022, when he missed the cut at The Open Championship. It was also his first time playing an official 72 holes since April 2022, when he finished +13 at the Masters. 

It was remarkable to see the iconic legend walk 72 holes in four days in what is one of the toughest courses to walk – especially considering he was in a near-fatal car accident roughly two years prior. Many experts weren’t sure if he would ever walk again, but now he’s back playing golf with the best in the world. 

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A Look Back at Tiger Woods’ Legendary Career

Tiger Woods has now played the Genesis Invitational 14 times and, while he has yet to win the tourney, he has won plenty of hardware elsewhere throughout his 31-year career. In fact, he has 110 total wins as a professional – 82 of which have come on the PGA Tour and 15 of which have come in a major event. 

Woods has spent a total of 683 weeks as the No. 1 player in the world – which is an all-time record. He also holds the record for most consecutive weeks at No. 1 – 281 weeks between June 2005 and October 2010. He also held that status for 264 consecutive weeks, while no other golfer has ever topped 100. 

He’s one of, if not the most dominant golfer the sport has ever seen and one of the most dominant athletes the sports community has ever seen. While his body won’t allow him to play like he used to, let’s honor his legacy by taking a look back at each of his 15 major championships he won in his career. 

15. 1997 Masters Tournament

On April 13, Tiger Woods won the 1997 Masters Tournament – the first major win of his career. At just 21 years old, he became the youngest golfer to ever win the tournament and was also the first non-white golfer to win the Masters. Not only that, but his score of 270 (-18) was a then-record for the tournament.

Woods started the 1997 Masters with the fourth-best score (-2) in the first round. He started to pull away with a -6 in the second round and -7 in the third round, heading into Sunday with a -15. His 9-shot lead turned into a 12-shot win after a -3 on Sunday. Costantino Rocca (Italy) came in second place at -6. 

14. 1999 PGA Championship

On August 15, Tiger Woods won the 1999 PGA Championship – the second major win of his career. He was 23 years old at the time and was having himself an incredible 1999 season. He was tied-18th at the 1999 Masters, tied-3rd at the 1999 U.S. Open, and tied-7th at the 1999 The Open Championship. 

Woods found himself tied-10th after the first round with a score of 70 (-2), but shot up the leaderboard with a 67 (-5) in the second round – he was in third place. A 68 on Saturday brought him to -11, which was tied for first place. He shot an even par in the final round and beat Sergio Garcia by one stroke.

13. 2000 U.S. Open

On June 18, Tiger Woods won the 2000 U.S. Open – the third major win of his career at just 24 years old. He was coming off a fifth place finish at the 2000 Masters just two months prior, but his 2000 U.S. Open was legendary. He ended up winning by 15 strokes, which is the most dominating major win in history. 

Woods shot a 65 (-6) in the first round, 69 (-2) in the second round, 71 (E) in the third round, and 67 (-4) in the final round to finish the tournament at 272 (-12). He was the only golfer to finish under par with Ernie Els (South Africa) and Miguel Ángel Jiménez (Spain) coming in second place with a 287 (+3). 

12. 2000 The Open Championship

On July 23, Tiger Woods won the 2000 The Open Championship – the fourth major win of his career at just 24 years old. It was the first time in his career that he won back-to-back major championships as he became the youngest golfer to complete a career grand slam – four others achieved it before Tiger.  

Woods started the tournament with a 67 (-5) in the first round, a 66 (-6) in the second round, a 67 (-5) in the third round, and a 69 (-3) in the final round – finishing with a 269 (-19). He was eight shots ahead of Thomas Bjørn (Denmark) and Ernie Els (South Africa), who both finished the tourney with a 277 (-11). 

11. 2000 PGA Championship

On August 20, Tiger Woods continued his impressive summer with a win at the 2000 PGA Championship – the fifth major of his career at 24 years old. It was his third consecutive major and second consecutive PGA Championship win, defending his title from 1999. It was also his first major win via a 3-hole playoff.

Woods started the tournament with a 66 (-6) in the first round, a 67 (-5) in the second round, a 70 (-2) in the third round, and a 67 (-5) in the final round to finish with a 270 (-18). He was tied with Bob May, who joined Tiger in setting a new PGA Championship record to par. Woods (-1) beat May (E) in the playoff.

10. 2001 Masters Tournament

On April 8, Tiger Woods won the 2001 Masters Tournament – the sixth major win of his career at just 25 years old. It was also his fourth consecutive major win, but it wasn’t considered a ‘Grand Slam’ because they didn’t all come in the same calendar year. Instead, his feat became known as the ‘Tiger Slam.’ 

Woods started with a 70 (-2) in the first round (tied-15th), a 66 (-6) in the second round (tied-2nd), a 68 (-4) in the third round (1st, and a 68 (-4) in the final round to finish with a 272 (-16). He was two shots ahead of David Duval (-14) and three shots ahead of Phil Mickelson (-13) – both from the United States.

9. 2002 Masters Tournament

On April 14, Tiger Woods won the 2002 Masters Tournament – the seventh major win of his career at just 26 years old. It was his third Masters win and his second consecutive Masters win – becoming the third golfer to defend his Masters championship. The two before him were Jack Nicklaus and Nick Faldo

Woods started the tournament with a 70 (-2) in the first round, a 69 (-3) in the second round, a 66 (-6) in the third round, and a 71 (-1) in the final round to finish with a score of 276 (-12). He was three shots ahead of Retief Goosen (South Africa) and four shots ahead of Phil Mickelson (United States). 

8. 2002 U.S. Open

On June 16, Tiger Woods won the 2002 U.S. Open – the eighth major win of his career at just 26 years old. It was his second win at the U.S. Open and his second consecutive major win after winning the Masters two months prior. He became the fifth golfer to follow up a Masters win with a U.S. Open win. 

Woods started the tournament with a 67 (-3) in the first round, a 68 (-2) in the second round, a 70 (E) in the third round, and a 72 (+2) in the fourth round to finish with a 277 (-3). He was the only golfer to score below par with Phil Mickelson coming in second place with a 280 (E). Tiger won $1 million for the victory.

7. 2005 Masters Tournament

On April 10, Tiger Woods won the 2005 Masters Tournament – the ninth major win of his career at 29 years old. It was also the fourth Masters win of his career and second major that he won in a playoff (first at the Masters). It had been nearly three years since his last major win, his longest drought since 1997. 

Woods struggled out of the gate, shooting a 74 (+2) in the first round, but moved up to third place in the second round with a 66 (-6) – at this point, he was still six shots behind first place. He shot a 65 (-7) in the third round to take the lead and a 71 (-1) on Sunday – beating Chris DiMarco by one shot in the playoff.

6. 2005 The Open Championship

On July 17, Tiger Woods won the 2005 The Open Championship – the 10th major win of his career at 29 years old. It was his second time winning The Open Championship, successfully completing his second career Grand Slam – meaning he won all four majors at least twice. He’s the youngest to achieve that. 

Woods led the field after each round, shooting a 66 (-6) in the first round, a 67 (-5) in the second round, a 71 (-1) in the third round, and a 70 (-2) in the final round – finishing with a 274 (-14). He was five shots ahead of Colin Montgomerie and six shots ahead of Fred Couples and José María Olazábal. 

5. 2006 The Open Championship

On July 23, Tiger Woods won the 2006 The Open Championship – the 11th major win of his career at 30 years old. It was also the third The Open Championship win of his career and his first time winning the tournament back-to-back – it came just a few months after his father, Earl Woods, passed away. 

Woods began the tournament with a 67 (-5) in the first round and followed that up with 65 (-7) in the second round – taking the lead. Over the weekend, he shot a 71 (-1) in the third round and 67 (-5) in the final round, finishing with a 270 (-18). He was two shots ahead of Chris DiMarco (United States). 

4. 2006 PGA Championship

On August 20, Tiger Woods won the 2006 PGA Championship – the 12th major win of his career at 30 years old. It was his third time winning the PGA Championship and his second consecutive major win after his The Open Championship win a few months back. He won $1.224 million for coming in first. 

Woods ended the first round in an 11-way tie for 10th place with a 69 (-3) and followed that up with a 68 (-4) in the second round. He finally took the lead with a 65 (-7) in the third round and shot a 68 (-4) in the final round to finish with a 270 (-18). He was five shots ahead of the runner-up, Shaun Micheel (US). 

3. 2007 PGA Championship

On August 12, Tiger Woods won the 2007 PGA Championship – the 13th major win of his career at 31 years old. It was his fourth time winning the PGA Championship and first time winning the tournament back-to-back. Earlier in the year, he finished tied-2nd at the Masters and tied-2nd at the U.S. Open. 

Woods struggled in the first round with a 71 (+1), but shot up to first place with an incredible 63 (-7) in the second round – tying a record for lowest score in a single round of a major championship. He shot a 69 (-1) in the third round and final round, finishing two shots ahead of Woody Austin (United States). 

2. 2008 U.S. Open

On June 16, Tiger Woods won the 2008 U.S. Open – the 14th major win of his career at 32 years old. It was his third U.S. Open win, third major win in a playoff, and first U.S. Open win in a playoff. He shot a 72 (+1) on Thursday, a 68 (-3) on Friday, a 70 (-1) on Saturday, and a 73 (+2) on Sunday to finish with a -1. 

He was tied with Rocco Mediate (United States) at the end of the final round, which spurred an 18-hole playoff between the two. The playoff was played on Monday with both players going back and forth. After both players finished even after 18 holes, they entered a sudden death – where Tiger won by one stroke.

1. 2019 Masters Tournament

On April 14, Tiger Woods won the 2019 Masters Tournament – the 15th major win of his career at 43 years old. It was an incredible achievement for Tiger, who hadn’t won a major in 11 years or a Masters in 14 years. He became the 11th-oldest golfer to win a major and second-oldest golfer to win a Masters.

Woods shot a 70 (-2) in the first round, a 68 (-4) in the second round, a 67 (-5) in the third round, and a 70 (-2) in the final round to finish with a 275 (-13). He defeated Dustin Johnson, Xander Schauffele, and Brooks Koepka by one shot to win $2 million. It was an emotional win for Tiger Woods and his family. 

Other Awards Tiger Woods Has Won

Tiger Woods has too many awards to list – for example, he was the PGA Tour Rookie of the Year in 1996, he’s an 11-time PGA Player of the Year and PGA Tour Player of the Year, 2-time FedEx Cup Champion, 9-time Vardon Trophy winner, 9-time Byron Nelson Award winner, and 10-time leading money winner. 

He was a golfer that shined brightest on the biggest stages. In addition to his 15 major wins, he finished as the runner-up seven times, third place four times, in the top-5 33 times, and in the top-10 41 times – including eight consecutive top-10s. Of the 90 majors he appeared in, he only missed the cut 14 times. 

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He was also awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2019 and inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2021. He’s one of a few billionaire athletes and one of two athletes to do so while still active – LeBron James being the other. Tiger Woods will be remembered as the GOAT on the golf course.

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