Albert Pujols Passes Alex Rodriguez With Home Run No. 697; Do You Know Who the Other All-Time Home Run Leaders Are?

Albert Pujols Passes Alex Rodriguez With Home Run No. 697; Do You Know Who the Other All-Time Home Run Leaders Are?

In a game against the Pirates on September 11, 2022, Albert Pujols hit his 697th career home run and is now in sole possession of fourth on the all-time home run leaders list. He passed Alex Rodriguez, who hit his 696th home run in 2016 as a member of the New York Yankees. 

Pujols’ home run came in the top of the ninth inning and gave his St. Louis Cardinals a late 3-2 lead – they later won the game 4-3. It was yet another impressive swing from the 42-year-old, who is in an exciting chase to No. 700 before he hangs his cleats up at the end of the season. 

He moved one step closer to that goal on September 16, 2022, hitting home run No. 698 against the Cincinnati Reds. It came in the bottom of the sixth inning and helped tie the game at 4-4. Despite giving up a run in the seventh, the Cardinals wound up winning that game 6-5.

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Who Are the All-Time Home Run Leaders?

Albert Pujols Passes Alex Rodriguez With Home Run No. 697; Do You Know Who the Other All-Time Home Run Leaders Are?
Debby Wong / Shutterstock

Albert Pujols is on a tear this season. He entered the year at 679 home runs and after a rough 2021 campaign, he knew going for 700 would be hard. Through July, he only had seven home runs, but he has hit 12 home runs since – including eight in August and four in September.

On the year, he’s batting .256 with 70 hits in 273 at-bats. He has 13 doubles, 19 home runs, 53 runs batted in, and 32 runs scored – all of which are improvements from last season. It has been a dream season and with 13 games remaining, we hope he can smash two more homers. 

Whether he hits those final two or not, Albert Pujols will end his career in sole possession of fourth place on the all-time home run leaders list. In honor of passing Alex Rodriguez with home run No. 697 and later No. 698, let’s look at the other all-time home run leaders in MLB history. 

20. Ted Williams – 521 home runs

Ted Williams, who’s also tied with Willie McCovey and Frank Thomas, hit 521 home runs throughout his 19-year career in the MLB – all of which with the Boston Red Sox. He hit a career-high 43 home runs in 1949 and hit at least 30 home runs in eight different seasons.

Williams retired with a .344 batting average and 2,654 hits in 7,706 at-bats. In addition to his 521 home runs, he hit 525 doubles, 71 triples, 1,839 RBIs, and 1,798 runs. He’s a Hall of Famer, two-time MVP, 19-time All-Star, and even won two Triple Crowns and six batting titles. 

19. Jimme Foxx – 534 home runs

Jimmie Foxx spent 20 years in the majors, mostly with the Boston Red Sox and Philadelphia Athletics. He hit 534 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 58 home runs in 1932 with the Athletics. He finished with at least 30 home runs in 12 consecutive seasons. 

Foxx retired with a .325 batting average and 2,646 hits in 8,134 at-bats. In addition to his 534 home runs, he hit 458 doubles, 125 triples, 1,922 RBIs, and 1,751 runs. He’s a Hall of Famer, three-time MVP, nine-time All-Star, two-time World Series champion, and won two batting titles.

18. Mickey Mantle – 536 home runs

Mickey Mantle spent 18 years in the major leagues – all of which with the New York Yankees. He hit 536 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 54 home runs in 1961 – he also led the MLB with 52 home runs in 1956. He hit at least 30 home runs nine different times. 

Mantle retired with a .298 batting average and 2,415 hits in 8,102 at-bats. In addition to his 536 home runs, he hit 344 doubles, 72 triples, 1,509 RBIs, 1,676 runs, and 153 stolen bases. He’s a Hall of Famer, three-time MVP, 20-time All-Star, and seven-time World Series champion. 

17. David Ortiz – 541 home runs

David Ortiz spent 20 years in the majors with the Boston Red Sox and Minnesota Twins. He hit 541 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 54 home runs in 2006 – which led the American League that year. He also managed to hit at least 30 home runs 10 different times. 

Ortiz retired with a .286 batting average and 2,472 hits in 8,640 at-bats. In addition to his 541 home runs, he had 632 doubles, 19 triples, 1,768 RBIs, and 1,419 runs scored. He’s a Hall of Famer, 10-time All-Star, three-time World Series champion, and seven-time Silver Slugger. 

16. Mike Schmidt – 548 home runs

Mike Schmidt spent 18 years in the major leagues – all of which with the Philadelphia Phillies. He hit 548 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 48 home runs in 1980. He led the MLB in home runs on six occasions and hit at least 30 home runs on 13 occasions. 

Schmidt retired with a .267 batting average and 2,234 hits in 8,352 at-bats. In addition to his 548 home runs, he had 408 doubles, 59 riples, 1,595 RBIs, 1,506 runs, and 174 stolen bases. He’s a Hall of Famer, three-time MVP, 12-time All-Star, and won the 1980 World Series with Philly.

15. Manny Ramirez – 555 home runs

Manny Ramirez spent 19 years in the majors – mostly with the Cleveland Guardians and Boston Red Sox. He hit 555 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 45 home runs in 1998 and 2005. He hit at least 30 home runs 12 times and 40 home runs five times. 

Ramirez retired with a .312 batting average and 2,574 hits in 8,244 at-bats. In addition to his 555 bombs, he had 547 doubles, 20 triples, 1,831 RBIs, and 1,544 runs scored. He’s a 12-time All-Star, nine-time Silver Slugger, two-time World Series champ, and former World Series MVP. 

14. Reggie Jackson – 563 home runs

Reggie Jackson spent 21 years in the major leagues – mostly with the A’s, Angels, and Yankees. He hit 563 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 47 home runs in 1969 – it was his third season in the MLB. He hit at least 30 home runs on seven occasions. 

Jackson retired with a .262 batting average and 2,584 hits in 9,864 at-bats. In addition to his 563 home runs, he had 43 doubles, 49 triples, 1,702 RBIs, 1,551 runs, and 228 stolen bases. He’s a Hall of Famer, 14-time All-Star, five-time World Series champion, and former MVP. 

13. Rafael Palmeiro – 569 home runs

Rafael Palmeiro spent 20 years in the major leagues, mostly with the Rangers and Orioles. He hit 569 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 47 home runs in 1999 and again in 2001. He hit at least 38 home runs in nine straight seasons between 1995 and 2003. 

Palmeiro retired with a .288 batting average and 3,020 hits in 10,472 at-bats. In addition to his 569 home runs, he had 585 doubles, 38 triples, 1,835 RBIs, and 1,663 runs. He’s a four-time All-Star, three-time Gold Glove winner, two-time Silver Slugger, and former Player of the Year. 

12. Harmon Killebrew – 573 home runs

Harmon Killebrew spent 22 years in the major leagues, mostly with the Minnesota Twins. He hit 573 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 49 home runs in 1964 and 1969. He hit at least 40 home runs on eight occasions and led the MLB in home runs four times. 

Killebrew retired with a .256 batting average and 2,086 hits in 8,147 at-bats. In addition to his 573 home runs, he had 290 doubles, 24 triples, 1,584 RBIs, and 1,283 runs scored. He’s a Hall of Famer, 13-time All-Star, and 1969 MVP – the year he led the MLB in home runs and RBIs. 

11. Mark McGwire – 583 home runs

Mark McGwire spent 16 seasons in the major leagues with the Oakland Athletics and St. Louis Cardinals. He hit 583 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 70 home runs in 1998 – a record that stood until 2001. He hit at least 50 home runs four times and 49 in 1987.

McGwire retired with a .263 batting average and 1,626 hits in 6,187 at-bats. In addition to his 583 home runs, he had 252 doubles, six triples, 1,414 RBIs, and 1,167 runs scored. He was a 12-time All-Star, 1989 World Series champ, three-time Silver Slugger, and steroid user. 

10. Frank Robinson – 586 home runs

Frank Robinson spent 21 seasons in the major leagues, mostly with the Cincinnati Reds and Baltimore Orioles. He hit 586 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 49 home runs in 1966 – which led the MLB that year. He hit at least 30 home runs on 11 occasions. 

Robinson retired with a .294 batting average and 2,943 hits in 10,006 at-bats. In addition to his 586 home runs, he had 528 doubles. 72 triples, 1,812 RBIs, 1,829 runs, and 204 stolen bases. He’s a Hall of Famer, 14-time All-Star, two-time MVP, and two-time World Series champion. 

9. Sammy Sosa – 609 home runs

Sammy Sosa spent 18 years in the major leagues, mostly with the Chicago Cubs and Chicago White Sox. He hit 609 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 66 home runs in 1998. He hit at least 30 home runs on 11 occasions and at least 60 home runs three times. 

Sosa retired with a .273 batting average and 2,408 hits in 8,813 at-bats. In addition to his 609 home runs, he had 379 doubles, 45 triples, 1,667 RBIs, 1,475 runs, and 234 stolen bases. He’s a seven-time All-Star, six-time Silver Slugger, 1998 MVP, and former Home Run Derby champ.

8. Jim Thome – 612 home runs

Jim Thome spent 22 years in the major leagues, mostly with the Guardians, Phillies, and White Sox. He hit 612 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 52 home runs in 2002 – he also hit 49 in 2001 and 47 in 2003. He also hit at least 30 home runs on 12 occasions. 

Thome retired with a .276 batting average and 2,328 hits in 8,422 at-bats. In addition to his 612 home runs, he had 451 doubles, 26 triples, 1,699 RBIs, and 1,583 runs scored. He’s a Hall of Famer, five-time All-Star, and won a Silver Slugger award in 1996, when he hit 38 home runs. 

7. Ken Griffey Jr. – 630 home runs

Ken Griffey Jr. spent 22 years in the major leagues, mostly with the Reds and Mariners. He hit 630 home runs in his career, including a career-high 56 home runs in back-to-back seasons in 1997 and 1998 – leading the AL both seasons. He also hit at least 40 home runs seven times. 

Griffey Jr. retired with a .284 batting average and 2,781 hits in 9,801 at-bats. In addition to his 630 home runs, he had 524 doubles, 38 triples, 1,836 RBIs, 1,662 runs, and 184 stolen bases. He’s a Hall of Famer, 13-time All-Star, three-time Home Run Derby champ, and former MVP. 

6. Willie Mays – 660 home runs

Willie Mays spent 23 years in the major leagues, mostly with the San Francisco Giants. He hit 660 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 52 home runs in 1965 – he also hit 51 home runs in 1955. He had at least 30 home runs 11 times and 40 dingers six times.

Mays retired with a .301 batting average and 3,293 hits in 10,924 at-bats. In addition to his 660 home runs, he had 525 doubles, 141 triples, 1,909 RBIs, 2,068 runs scored, and 338 stolen bases. He’s a Hall of Famer, 24-time All-Star, two-time MVP, and 1954 World Series champion. 

5. Alex Rodriguez – 696 home runs

Alex Rodriguez spent 22 years in the major leagues, mostly with the New York Yankees and Seattle Mariners. He hit 696 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 57 home runs in 2002 – as well as 54 in 2007 and 52 in 2001. He hit at least 30 home runs 15 times.

Rodriguez retired with a .295 batting average and 3,115 hits in 10,566 at-bats. In addition to his 696 home runs, he had 548 doubles, 31 triples, 2,086 RBIs, 2,021 runs, and 329 stolen bases. He’s a 14-time All-Star, three-time MVP, 10-time Silver Slugger, and 2009 World Series champ.

4. Albert Pujols – 698 home runs

Albert Pujols, the man of the hour, is in the midst of his 22nd season in the major leagues – it’ll also be his last before retiring. He has hit 698 home runs, but that could change any day now, including a career-high 49 home runs in 2006. He has hit at least 30 home runs 14 times. 

Pujols currently has a .296 career batting average and 3,373 hits in 11,390 at-bats. In addition to his 698 home runs, he has 685 doubles, 16 triples, 2,203 RBIs, and 1,904 runs scored. He’s a future Hall of Famer, 11-time All-Star, three-time MVP, and two-time World Series champion.

3. Babe Ruth – 714 home runs

Babe Ruth spent 22 years in the major leagues, mostly with the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox. He hit 714 home runs throughout his career, including a career-high 60 home runs in 1927 – he also hit 59 home runs in 1921. He hit at least 40 home runs on 11 occasions. 

Ruth retired with a .342 batting average and 2,873 hits in 8,399 at-bats. In addition to his 714 home runs, he had 506 doubles, 136 triples, 2,214 RBIs, and 2,174 runs. He’s a Hall of Famer and MVP that won four World Series titles with the Yankees and three more with the Red Sox.

2. Hank Aaron – 755 home runs

Hank Aaron spent 23 years in the major leagues, mostly with the Atlanta Braves. He hit 755 home runs throughout his legendary career, including a career-high 47 home runs in 1971. He hit at least 30 home runs on 15 occasions and at least 40 home runs on eight occasions. 

Aaron retired with a .305 batting average and 3,771 hits in 12,364 at-bats. In addition to his 755 home runs, he had 624 doubles, 98 triples, 2,297 RBISs (most all-time), 2,174 runs, and 240 stolen bases. He’s a Hall of Famer, 25-time All-Star, MVP, and 1957 World Series champion. 

1. Barry Bonds – 762 home runs

Barry Bonds spent 22 years in the major leagues with the San Francisco Giants and Pittsburgh Pirates. He hit an all-time high of 762 home runs throughout his career, including an all-time best 73 home runs in 2001. He hit at least 40 home runs 8 times and 30 home runs 14 times.

Bonds retired with a .298 batting average and 2,935 hits in 9,847 at-bats. In addition to his 762 home runs, he had 601 doubles, 77 triples, 1,996 RBIs, 2,227 runs, and 514 stolen bases. He’s a 14-time All-Star, seven-time MVP, 12-time Silver Slugger, and Home Run Derby champion. 

Who Are the Best Home Run Hitters Today?

Albert Pujols Passes Alex Rodriguez With Home Run No. 697; Do You Know Who the Other All-Time Home Run Leaders Are?
Dan Schreiber / Shutterstock

Those are some of the greatest home run hitters we’ve ever seen step up to the plate, but let’s not forget that there are some power hitters worth keeping an eye on in the MLB today – not just Albert Pujols. For example, Aaron Judge is closing in on a historic record himself this season. 

On September 20, 2022, Aaron Judge hit his 60th home run of the year – becoming the sixth MLB player to achieve the feat. He’s one home run away from tying the American League, currently held by Roger Maris. The major league record is held by Barry Bonds (73 home runs).

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Outside of Judge, some of the other power hitters in the MLB this year are Pete Alonso, Mike Trout, Shohei Ohtani, Kyle Schwarber, Rafael Devers, Austin Riley, Yordan Alvarez, Paul Goldschmidt, Mookie Betts, Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Manny Machado, and Anthony Rizzo.

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